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Myanmar still using rape as weapon of war: women's group

- - - - - rape human right abuse military conflict

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#1
Max

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A women's group says that Myanmar's military is still using rape as a weapon of war, with more than 100 women and girls raped by the army since a 2010 election brought about a nominally civilian government that has pursued rapprochement with the West.

The Thailand-based Women's League of Burma said in a report made available to Reuters on Monday that 47 of the cases documented were gang rapes and 28 of the women were either killed or had died of their injuries. It said several victims were as young as eight. The report was dated January.

The group said the issue showed the need for legal reform in Myanmar, also known as Burma, and for changes to a 2008 constitution to ensure that the military is placed under civilian control.

Myanmar's government denied rape was used as a means of war.

"It's not the policy of our Tatmadaw (military) to use rapes as weapons," presidential spokesman Ye Htut told Reuters.

"If there are rape cases committed by individual members, we try to expose them and take effective action against the offenders. It would be very helpful in taking action against the offenders if those who prepared that report could send us the details of the cases," he said.

The report from the women's group comes less than a month after a bipartisan group of prominent U.S. senators, Bob Menendez, Marco Rubio, Ben Cardin and Bob Corker, introduced a bill that said the Myanmar government should not receive any funds made available to the Pentagon in 2014 until there is reform and rights abuses are addressed.

 

Read more: http://www.reuters.c...EA0D1I020140114


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#2
stardust

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I'm ethnic chin,born in Yangon but raised up all over Burma and finished my education in India.

My childhood days of age 5,I vividly rememebr hearing stories upon stories,discussions among elders since 1994.

It's been happening since then.

Soldiers cross our village often and I don't think I need to tell the rest of the story.

What I'm surprised is the country's reaction to the Rohingyas and Rakhine's issue and the non-reaction to us ethnics.


:wub: Peace & Love


#3
Max

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It's indeed difficult to understand that this news are not really into the light and hidden from the public, it's very seldom that I read about it compared to other issues in Myanmar and notably the Rohingya/Rakhine issue. 

These are both tragedies that are worth coverage, and I hope that this report will improve the situation of ethnic villagers and diminish if not destroy this horrible actions the military tend have for already 20 years.

 

Cheers and all my support to the victims of this atrocities,

Max



#4
stardust

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Thank you so much,that means a lot.

We don't want people to retaliate with hate,we just expect equal awareness of the situations happening here.

:)

Esther


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#5
Max

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You're very welcome.

 

Hatred is surely not the right weapon to reply to hatred and violence, public awareness is good start indeed, let's hope this will make more waves, within the military as well. But I am also concerned that even if the highest power of the military decide to take actions against these barbaric acts, it may not have the suited impact, as the officers may or may not follow the orders, as it has already been seen for such things.

 

The best way to end this would simply be through a permanent ceasefire, or peace if we can dream of that for Myanmar. 

Let's have face that these peace negotiations and talks this year will bring a positive outcome and will finally be a success, and not only on paper, but on the ground as well. 

And maybe, who knows, the perpetrators of these filthy acts will be brought to court.

 

May this become really and not only a dream.

Cheers,

Max


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